This issue of COS magazine for Spring and Summer 2015 is inspired by a love of paper and the tactile pleasure of consuming words, images and ideas on the printed page.

Innovation
Innovation
Crisp and new fashions for women
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Rolodex
Rolodex
An essay on the Rolodex,
the machine made of paper
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Charge
Charge
The collection for men in an
enlightening setting
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Linder SterlingOn editing a paper world
from exciting images
The precise and provocative collage
artist Linder
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Stationery
Stationery
Stationery of note
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1m2 of paper
1m2 of paper
On the blue pages throughout, six
guest contributors explore the
possibilities of what can be achieved
with 1m2 of white paper
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Gerhard SteidlOn how to make an incredible publication from scratch – including the paper itselfHi-tech publisher Gerhard Steidl
in his print atelier
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New Leaf
New Leaf
A descriptive compendium of materials that make up this season’s collection
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Taiye SelasiOn being a boundless
international writer
Author Taiye Selasi on the call of
reading and writing
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In Contrast
In Contrast
Novel accessories of the season
in black and white
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Sylvia WhitmanOn running the Parisian book circus that is Shakespeare and CompanyThe celebrated seller of books
Sylvia Whitman
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OnPaper
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An advanced modernity
energises the women’s collection.

Photography by Karim Sadli
Styling by Jonathan Kaye

Innovation

White one-sleeved cotton sateen dress worn with white
leatherstrap sandals with metal closure

Double-layer dress in cotton poplin

White laser-cut mesh scuba dress

White cotton poplin shirt and white cotton-mix skirt burnt out
with fragmented typography

Black cotton-mix zip-up jacket, black pencil skirt in techni-
cal nylon and white leather-strap sandals with metal closure

Black stretch silk A-line dress with cutaway
hem and slashes at the back worn with white
leather-strap sandals with metal closure

Light-blue cotton poplin top with rubberised zip

White one-sleeved cotton sateen dress

Tinted-green technical shirt dress, white cotton dress and
white leather-strap sandals with metal closure

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An electrifying update for the
men’s summer wardrobe.

Photography by Karim Sadli
Styling by Jonathan Kaye

Charge

Stone-coloured cotton-silk knit bomber
with integrated collar and rubberised zip

White cotton-silk knit top and white technical cotton
gilet with black hand-drawn graphic

Black ribbed cotton knitted jumper and black tailored Tencel
shorts worn with black-and- white cotton cap and black
scored-leather closed-back sandals with contrasting sole

Black-and-white short-sleeved cotton jersey top
worn with black-and-white cotton cap

White cotton shirt with black hand-drawn graphic and black mesh
reversible zip-up jacket worn with black tailored cotton trousers

Black-and-white cotton jersey top worn with black wool
shorts, black-and-white cotton cap and black scored-leather
sandals

White cotton shirt with brushstroke print and navy technical-cotton
shirt jacket

Black wool drawstring top worn with black wool drawstring
trousers and black scored-leather closed-back sandals with
contrast sole

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1m2 of paper
Six guest contributors explore
the possibilities of what can be
achieved with 1m2 of white paper
Photography throughout by severafrahm, text by Mark Smith

1m2 of paper

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Möbius strip
by Julia Born,
graphic designer

COS magazine invited six enquiring minds to explore the possibilities of a square metre of white paper. First up is Julia Born, the Swiss-born designer living in Berlin, whose genre-spanning work, developed in dialogue with curators and fellow artists, often seeks to explore the idea of the piece of paper as an object. Julia considers the single sheet of paper to be a rare mystery, occupying an ambiguous territory somewhere between the two and three-dimensional. For COS magazine she explores this idea with her square-based reimagining of the Möbius strip, the object with one continuous surface that results from twisting a strip of material and then joining the two ends with black tape. It’s magical.

1m2 of paper

2/6

Inkblot tower
by Anne Holtrop,
architect

Amsterdam-based Anne Holtrop says he thoroughly enjoys the process of creating architectural maquettes, regardless of whether or not they ever see the light of day as full-scale projects (although they often do – his pavilion at this year’s Expo Milano is the spectacular shelter for a host of Bahraini exhibits). During the model-making process, he often draws inspiration for the “footprint” of his structures from his extensive library of self-made ink stains on paper. The intriguing outline of one such blot forms the shape of Anne’s 12-storey creation for COS magazine, seen here, all neatly clipped from a square metre of paper. The offcuts were then rolled tightly to create the vertical ligaments. Anne is editor-in-chief of Oase, a brilliant architectural digest that’s published in Dutch and English.

1m2 of paper

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Square circle
by Lernert & Sander,
directors/artists

Lernert Engelberts and Sander Plug are the Dutch duo whose beautifully considered, pleasantly bonkers short films – a chocolate bunny being melted by a variety of household appliances, for example, and their award-winning The Sound of COS – go viral as soon as they’ve made the leap from imagination to internet. With trademark playful wit, they have chosen to reverse the well-worn concept of “squaring the circle” in their submission: a perfect round derived from a square of paper. This deceptively simple idea took no shortcuts, however. The rounded extensions of the shape have been meticulously assembled from the corners snipped from the original square.

1m2 of paper

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Paper on paper
by Hiroshi Eguchi,
publisher

A forerunner among the new breed of Japanese publishing creatives, Hiroshi Eguchi is the artist-proprietor behind Utrecht, a publishing house and meeting point based in the once-sleepy Tokyo district of Nakameguro. For his COS magazine creation, Hiroshi’s first action was to crop the sheet into a 60cm square. He burned the offcuts in a small dish in order to make painting materials out of the paper itself. He used the resulting charcoal and ash to paint a haunting rectangle whose dimensions recall – what else – a sheet of paper.

1m2 of paper

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A pocket square
by Amie Dicke,
artist

By her own admission, Dutch artist Amie Dicke is unaccustomed to working with blank paper of unconventional dimensions. Indeed, the artist, whose work has appeared in the Tate Modern in London and the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, is best known for assemblages of photographic images cut from the pages of glossy magazines. For her COS magazine submission, Amie was compelled to investigate the idea of space and compression by folding a square metre of delicate sketch paper to the point where it could be carried in that most intimate of hidden spaces, the pocket. The artist carried this version around with her for days in order to achieve its worn edges.

1m2 of paper

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Table template
by Khalid Shafar,
industrial designer

Khalid Shafar is the rising star of Emirati industrial design whose playful works fuse modernist and traditional influences. His modular white marble tables, for example, are bound together with locally sourced camel leather. Appropriately for a man operating in Dubai, a city whose name is often used as shorthand for opulence, Khalid has chosen to examine the relationship between luxury and paper with his square metre. Whereas white linen table coverings and napkins have come to be closely associated with fine dining, their paper counterparts are a marker of disposability and fast food. In creating a bespoke table setting that combines bone china and pristine, monogrammed paper, he ponders whether the status of paper in our society can be reconsidered.

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1 2 3 4

A new collection of accessories formulated for impact, photographed by Jason Evans

Photographed by Jason Evans

In Contrast

White rubber-and-plastic fragmented typography
necklace and bracelet

Black scored-leather closed-back sandals
with contrasting sole

Black structured-leather card holder

White leather-and-plastic tube belt with
clasp fastening

White soft leather bag with powder-coated clasp

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1 2 3
What a treat not only to receive an actual, tangible letter but to enjoy
it on personalised stationery. With its myriad subtle signifiers, a custom-
made letterhead is the paper equivalent of a handshake.

Photography by Marius W. Hansen
What a treat not only to receive an actual, tangible letter but to enjoy it on personalised stationery. With its myriad subtle signifiers, a custom-made letterhead is the paper equivalent of a handshake.

Photography by Marius W. Hansen

Stationery

Less lavish but nonetheless efficient is industrial
designer Konstantin Grcic’s letterhead

Fashion industry power broker Floriane
de Saint Pierre’s paper shines discreetly
thanks to the glossy strip along its top.
Less lavish but nonetheless efficient is
industrial designer Konstantin Grcic’s
letterhead, on the left.

Fashion industry power broker Floriane de Saint Pierre’s paper shines
discreetly thanks to the glossy strip along its top.

With the compliments of two uncompromising
individuals working from London:
the columnist Janet Street-Porter and the
sculptural designer Max Lamb.
At right, two contemporaries at the top of
their chosen fields, both with a nostalgic
taste in typography: chef Yotam Ottolenghi
opts for a refined retro typeface, film director
Roman Coppola for old-Hollywood
grandeur.

With the compliments of two uncompromising indi-
viduals working from London: the columnist Janet
Street-Porter and the sculptural designer Max Lamb.

Two contemporaries at the top of their chosen fields,
both with a nostalgic taste in typography: chef Yotam
Ottolenghi opts for a refined retro typeface, film direc-
tor Roman Coppola for old-Hollywood grandeur.

Both operating in the high echelons of art but with
distinctly different specialisms (and stationeries)
are the horticultural innovator Piet Oudolf and
Chris Dercon, the director of London’s magnifi-
cent Tate Modern museum.
At right, not to be confused with the affectionate
Dutch word for grandmother, OMA is the name
of the Rotterdam based studio established by the
visionary architect Rem Koolhaas.

Both operating in the high echelons of art but with
distinctly different specialisms (and stationeries) are
the horticultural innovator Piet Oudolf and Chris Der-
con, the director of London’s magnificent Tate
Modern museum.

Not to be confused with the affectionate Dutch word
for grandmother, OMA is the name of the Rotter
dam-based studio established by the visionary
architect Rem Koolhaas.

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Material innovation
stands at the vanguard
of good design.
Photography Maurice Scheltens & Liesbeth Abbenes

New Leaf

On the left, nylon mesh is bonded between two layers of cotton for an intriguing
sporty fabric thatlends body to this white skirt with off-centre front slit.
On the right, a perforated cotton sleeveless shirt with concealed button placket and a shorter
back panel. The micro pin hem is the smallest that's technically possible.

A white silk-and-cotton blend short-sleeve top for men in ultra-flat
Milano stitch features a nylon trim over the centre back in contrasting stone colour.
On the right, the white cotton poplin base of this layered dress sits
beneath tinted technical veil with laser-cut seams.

Two strikingly different materials combine in what feels like one cohesive fabric.
The black nylon of this pencil skirt is bonded with a cotton loop-back.
On the right, in a bold new take on lace, a graphic motif of deconstructed
typography is applied to this shift dress using a burn-out technique.

On the left: A silk-and-cotton Milano stitch creates a clean surface in this men's cardigan.
The silk adds lustre to the knit. The collar and cuffs are rendered in nylon,
hence the slight contrast, while the garment is essentially of one colour: stone.
On the right, the panels of this transparent shirt dress in a tinted-
green polyester are laser-cut for simplicity.

On the left, a women's top in a double jacquard deploys
a combination of cotton and nylon to create a spongy, three-dimensional effect.
On the right, the triangular pattern on the front panel of this men's
sweater in technical jersey has a bouncy feel effected through heat embossing.

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